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A 16-year-old boy was beheaded by the notorious fundamentalist organization Islamic State for not attending mandatory Friday prayer services in the border town of Jarabulus, Syria

A 16-year-old boy was beheaded by the notorious fundamentalist organization Islamic State for not attending mandatory Friday prayer services in the border town of Jarabulus, Syria

Index of articles

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With free speech, it's like that: You can make any offending remarks about white men, and the mainstream media and mainstream opinion will applaud you. You can't say anything negative about feminism. Feminism is sacrosanct. Fuck it.

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Butea superba is a vine that grows in India, China, Vietnam, and Thailand.

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Plastic surgery report: Demand for designer vaginas fastest-growing here

KUALA LUMPUR, Feb 26 — Demand for designer vagina procedures in Malaysia skyrocketed in comparison to other plastic surgery treatments, a report by private healthcare search engine WhatClinic.com has indicated.

In explaining the triple digit growth of almost 200 per cent in interest for the laser vaginal rejuvenation procedure, the report highlighted the relatively fuss-free nature of the treatment to tighten the vagina.

“The treatment is relatively pain free and the patient can return to a normal day to day routine very soon after,” the clinic comparison site’s annual global report said.

In its analysis of 10,290 email enquiries to over 100 Malaysian clinics made through the online clinic directory site over the past two years, WhatClinic.com’s data showed a whopping 191 per cent jump in interest in the laser vaginal rejuvenation procedure in Malaysia with a leap from 103 enquiries in 2015 to 300 in 2016.

At an average starting price of RM2,575 based on last year’s figures, laser vaginal rejuvenation is also the cheapest among the country’s top 10 plastic surgery treatments WhatClinic.com users enquired about.

Based on both enquiries locally and from abroad, liposuction which removes excess body fat attracted the greatest interest with 1,201 enquiries alone last year, while eyelid surgery and the procedure to shift body fat to another part of the body were also in the top three list last year at 577 and 563 enquiries respectively.

In terms of percentage, however, interest in seven out of the top 10 treatments sought by patients fell at an average rate of 20.8 per cent when compared against the previous year, including liposuction and eyelid surgery which fell by 32 per cent and 19 per cent, as well as breast implants (-26 per cent) and rhinoplasty to reshape the nose (-24 per cent).

It is unclear how big a role pricing plays in these trends, as the average starting price last year for the seven treatments that experienced a fall in interest mostly fall in the range of RM7,833 to RM17,874 with only one of them at RM4,400 (eyelid surgery).

Two of the three treatments in the list showing growing popularity had average starting prices of RM8,723 (gynecomastia or treatment to correct enlarged male breasts) and RM8,736 (fat transfer) as compared to rising star laser vaginal rejuvenation at RM2,575.

Weighing in on the interest levels in Malaysia’s plastic surgery services, WhatClinic.com said: “We haven’t seen a huge increase overall, in fact there was a 4 per cent decrease in interest in plastic surgery when we compared the past three months to the same period one year ago—however there has been growth from overseas in some treatments.”

The young ones

Out of the 4,777 email enquiries last year for local plastic surgery services, the bulk of them came from those in the younger age groups of 25 to 34 at 43 per cent and 35 to 44 at 20 per cent respectively, with demand gradually decreasing from these two age groups onwards. Those in the 18 to 24 age group represent the third largest group by accounting for 18 per cent of the enquiries.

“The demographics are consistent with global trends of recent. Digitally connected millennials are bombarded with more and more ‘versions’ of beauty by brands and their peers. This causes pressure to achieve the best possible look,” Philip Boyle, WhatClinic’s Head of Consumer Matters, told Malay Mail Online.

Although women continued to dominate last year in terms of number of enquiries made for plastic surgery services in Malaysia at 70 per cent, WhatClinic.com noted that the number of men seeking such treatments has seen a “sharp increase” over the past few years, predicting that the balance will shift in the future.

US and Australia loving it

Medical tourists from Australia, US and the UK showed growing interest in plastic surgery services in Malaysia, with an annual growth last year of 10 per cent, 32 per cent and 6 per cent respectively, while the two other countries in the top five list — neighbours Singapore and Indonesia — showed lesser demand with a fall of 21 per cent and 34 per cent respectively.

Boyle cited “currency advantages” for Malaysia’s popularity among visitors from Australia and the US, while WhatClinic.com predicted that the strong growth figures from Australia meant the trend from that country was likely to continue.

“The US is Malaysia’s fastest growing medical tourism market, growing 32 per cent in the past 12 months. This has no doubt been influenced by the weakening ringgit (MYR) against the dollar (USD),” the report said.

WhatClinic.com also attributed Malaysia’s popularity for plastic surgery to government initiatives to promote the country as a medical tourism destination, as well as the improved quality and reputation of Malaysian plastic surgeons.

As for the plastic surgery treatment in Malaysia favoured by medical tourists, liposuction was the firm favourite last year with its 409 enquiries. This is almost twice as many as the second on the list, rhinoplasty at 209 enquiries.

This was followed by breast implants, fat transfer and eyelid surgery, with the latter showing a marked decline of 28 per cent from 221 enquiries in 2015 to 160 enquiries last year.

Fat transfer appears to be the treatment of the year, experiencing 2.2x growth in the 12 months to January 2017,” the report said, referring to the growth of 120 per cent from 89 enquiries in 2015 to 196 enquiries last year.

What is ‘beauty’ now?

Boyle said the treatment trends reflect consumer interest, with more showing a preference for safer treatments such as fat transfer — which is less risky due to the use of the patients’ own cells.

For the star treatments of laser vaginal rejuvenation and fat transfer, Boyle cited “increased availability, increased awareness, word of mouth” as factors driving the demand for these procedures in Malaysia.

Commenting on the decline in demand for some treatments such as liposuction, eyelid surgery and rhinoplasty, Boyle said: “There are now more non-surgical options than ever before—fat freezing and the non-surgical nose jobs are now available as less invasive, and more affordable options.”

Boyle also told Malay Mail Online that the change in demand for certain types of plastic surgery procedures is linked to both affordability and a change in the sense of beauty.

“We have seen global trends for butt implants and fuller thicker eyebrows (which many have attributed to popular celebrities and models) We have also seen in the UK, smaller breast implants, as more and more women become interested in fitness. Laser hair removal has become extremely popular.

“We have also seen growth in demand for eyelid and chin surgeries.

“All of these are linked to changes in what ‘beauty’ means. Not to mention the medical aesthetic market, which is bringing out things like vampire facials and fat freezing to consumers,” he said.

(A vampire facial is where a person’s own platelet rich plasma is injected into her face to help the skin renew and rejuvenate.)

The next big hit?

“Hair transplant is overtaking breast augmentation as the fastest growing plastic surgery procedure. It’s also being used to repair eyebrows, and fill patchy beards!” Boyle said.

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Many men who are good in making money are total failures when it comes to spending it. If you have money, buy love, and the best sex ever. Because having the best sex ever not only is satisfaction, but also generates your immortal soul. See Kreutz Religion.

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Islamize Europe and get women out of politics. Feminism is the root if terrorism.

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A Controversial Procedure To Restore The Clitoris After FGM

When Kiki was nine years old, in Guinea, she thought she was being taken to buy some Play-Doh. Instead, she was taken to a stranger’s house and forced to undergo a procedure known as female genital mutilation (FGM), sometimes referred to as female genital cutting. Over 200 million women around the world have undergone FGM, but Kiki is one of only a few thousand who have attempted to surgically reverse its effects, electing to have a so-called clitoral restoration surgery.

The restorative surgery is seemingly a godsend for women who unwittingly underwent FGM as children — offering the chance to both physically restore sensation and also the opportunity to reclaim their own sexuality. But the procedure is not without controversy. Because the surgery is relatively new, and therapy can help with psychological issues, not all experts are convinced that surgery is the best option for FGM victims in the long-term. Further complicating the conversation around the procedure is the fact that one of its largest proponents is a new religion that believes extraterrestrials engineered life on Earth. (More on that later.)

In Kiki’s home country of Guinea, FGM is traditional—70 percent of women in the country aged 20 to 24 were cut before age 10. And although her mother’s family, devoutly Muslim, didn’t approve of the practice, the women on her father’s side encouraged it.

On the day of her FGM, her aunt took her to a stranger’s house. “The next thing I knew, I was jumped on,” Kiki, whose name has been changed for this story, recalls to Vocativ. “When you feel like someone is about to harm you, you want to run. I tried to take off, they circled me, next thing I knew I was on the ground.” Kiki was taken to the backyard. One woman sat on her chest, making it hard to breathe, while another two women pulled her legs apart. Kiki recalls being overcome by pain and fear; at some point during the procedure, she says, she lost consciousness.

In the immediate aftermath of cutting, women can feel severe pain, bleeding or have infections; in the long term, they might have pain during urination, menstruation, or intercourse; buildup of scar tissue; and psychological problems like depression or post-traumatic stress disorder.

Now Kiki lives in Indiana, having graduated not long ago from university there. When she first tried to have sex in college, it was painful. She could have an orgasm, but “it was a struggle…it would take a while,” she says. Her friends would talk about their great sex lives, and she would just listen, nodding. “‘Why are you so quiet?’ they would ask me. And I would say, ‘Well, what do you want me to say?’”

A few years ago, she heard about clitoral restoration and set out on a path that would ultimately change her relationship to sex and to her own identity.

On a physical level, the goal of clitoral restoration is to reduce pain and restore lost sensation to women’s genitals. On an abstract level, it can help victims of FGM take ownership of their identity and sexuality.

FGM is a catch-all term that refers to a range of procedures, from the entire removal of the external part of the clitoris (clitorectomy) to “nicking” the clitoris but leaving it intact. There are lots of reasons why cultures continue to perform FGM, but it’s no coincidence that it involves the organ that is the nexus of much of a woman’s sexual pleasure. “In some cultures, women are told that if they don’t cut the clitoris, it will be big or make a woman hypersexual so that she will not be marriageable,” says Jasmine Abdulcadir, a gynecologist at Geneva University Hospitals in Switzerland, where she runs a clinic for victims of FGM.

But, much like an iceberg, only a small percentage of the clitoris is visible outside the body. So even if the visible part has been nicked or removed, as is the case among women who fit into the first two classes of FGM, there’s more tissue inside the body. To perform a clitoral restoration procedure, the surgeon slices open the area around where the clitoral tissue would typically exit the body, and simply pulls down the existing tissue, fastening it to the surrounding tissues to keep it in place.

“When I go to reconstruct clitorises where there has been cutting, the clitoris is always there 100 percent of the time. There’s no question it’s still there,” says Marci Bowers, an OBGYN who has performed more than 200 clitoral restoration procedures. “In fact, in one third of cases where I operate, the clitoris is completely intact. There’s nothing missing. It’s just covered in a web of scar tissue.”

The surgery itself takes less than an hour and is done under anesthesia. The recovery usually takes a few months.

First performed in Egypt 2006, clitoral restoration procedures truly started to gain traction in 2012, when French surgeon Pierre Foldes published a study for which he performed the procedure on nearly 3,000 women. A year after the operation, Foldes followed up with about 30 percent of the patients, and found that most of them had reduced pain and increased sensation in the clitoris. Half had even experienced an orgasm.

The results were a sensation, sparking interest among other surgeons and patients alike, plus kicking off a flurry of stories in the popular press.

Today there are a handful of surgeons running clinics scattered across the world—Geneva, Burkina Faso, San Francisco—who know how to perform the clitoral restorations. One of the biggest orchestrators is a Las Vegas-nonprofit called Clitoraid. The organization was founded in the philosophy of the Raelian Movement, a religion with followers that believe that human extraterrestrials engineered and synthesized DNA to create all life on Earth. Rael, the founder of the religion, reportedly saw first-hand what effects FGM can have on women during a visit to West Africa in 2003, according to a Clitoraid press officer.

In Raelism, pleasure is an important way to connect to the extraterrestrial creators, and FGM works counter to that mission. “When barbaric traditions cut off the clitoris of little girls, not only do they violate their right to body integrity as children, but they also violate their very right to feel mentally and emotionally balanced and harmonious throughout their lives,” the press officer told Vocativ in an email.

Clitoraid now mostly serves to raise awareness for FGM and to foster connections for clitoral restoration procedures—between surgeons so that they can be trained to perform them, between victims of FGM and doctors to do the surgery.

That’s how Kiki found out about the clitoral restoration procedure. When she came to the U.S. for college, she was evaluated by a doctor who suggested that Kiki look into it. “Since I’m a curious person, I started doing research online,” Kiki says. She contacted Clitoraid and, in early 2015, she hopped on a plane to meet Harold Henning, one of the two surgeons in the country performing the procedure at the time (and the only one who is also Raelian). Kiki didn’t pay anything for the surgery itself, she says—just her plane ticket and the $500 hospital fee. She knew about the organization’s connection to Raelism, but it wasn’t pushed on her; she doesn’t remember ever talking about it with Henning.

Kiki’s recovery went quickly and within a few months she was totally healed. Now, more than a year later, she says you can’t even tell she had surgery. And It’s been a game-changer for her sex life: “I was not feeling much pleasure. Now it’s completely different,” she says.

If the effects of FGM were only physical — or if all cases were as straightforward as Kiki’s — experts would likely recommend the procedure unequivocally. But FGM is much more complex than that. The surgery comes with risks, things like infection and complications. And, even if it goes according to plan, it might not address the psychological issues like fear of intimacy.

Abdulcadir, who runs the clinic in Geneva, has the training to perform the surgery, but she considers it a last resort. Of the approximately 15 women who come to her clinic every month, only about 20 percent ask for the surgery (the rest are seeking help due to pregnancy or complications from FGM). Those that do want the surgery spend three months meeting with psychiatrists and sex therapists, and receiving education about their own anatomy, before the surgery is a possibility. “Once they start to know how their bodies work, how their anatomy and clitoris are, the majority of them do not go for surgery—their needs are met by counseling and education,” Abdulcadir says.

Part of the reason for this is that Abdulcadir has reservations about the long-term effects of the procedure. Foldes, in his seminal study, followed up with less than a third of the patients, and only after a year. “What happens after five years? After 10? When a woman changes partners or when she has kids? We’ve had studies about clitoral restoration procedures,” Abdulcadir says, “But now we need good, quality studies with long-term follow-ups.”

This lack of long-term data is part of the reason that the World Health Organization, in the recently-published guidelines about FGM (of which Abdulcadir was one of the collaborators), stated that there’s not yet enough evidence to wholeheartedly recommend the procedure.

Mariya Karimjee, a freelance writer based in Karachi, Pakistan who has publicly discussed her experience of being cut and its effects on her as an adult, says she thought about the surgery when she first heard about Foldes’ study. She brought it up with her doctor, but he didn’t sound totally convinced by the science, Karimjee recalls, in part because there wasn’t enough long-term follow-up.

Eventually, she gave up on the idea of the surgery. “I wanted an easy fix, to undo the damage,” Karimjee says. “It sounds appealing. But at this point in my life I don’t know that it really is a quick fix.” It would take months for the skin to regrow, and it would be painful. “I don’t need any more pain.”

Bowers and Henning, both of whom perform the surgery primarily on patients from Clitoriad, agree that counseling is important, but believe the surgery is as well. The procedure is medically sound, Bowers says, but “the question is, psychologically, is it worthwhile? You don’t want to re-traumatize someone.” She recommends sex therapy to many of her patients after the surgery.

Henning believes that all people could benefit from sex therapy, “but that’s not criteria for surgery,” he says. “Most of these women have lived with this for many years. They have already had all the experiences they’re going to have with sexuality beforehand.”

For her part, Bowers is disappointed by WHO’s cautionary approach in recommending the restoration procedure. “It does need to be evidence-based, there’s a healthy reason for that. But what they’ve said, that’s really misinformation. All it takes is to hear one personal account of someone having the first orgasm in their life to say there’s no more evidence needed. This works.”

There’s certainly no one-size-fits-all solution for how women deal with the effects of FGM. Karimjee plans to find a sex therapist—“I would rather figure out if there’s a psychological trauma, and do that hard work. Even if I had surgery I would probably need that,” she says.

But for Kiki, who has never seen a therapist and has no plans to do so in the near future, the procedure was enough to restore her sexual function.

More importantly, the surgery make her feel like whole self. “Someone took something away from me that they were not entitled to. They did it just for the sake of it, out of cruelty,” Kiki says. “Now I got that back.”

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Contribute to the neomasculine cause by helping to finance its propaganda. Make an anonymous donation to Serge Kreutz to keep up our websites, and ultimately change the world.

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If you are still invested in the real estate of European cities, get out! A terrorist attack with chemical weapons will happen. There will be hoards of people who won't want to live in urban centers.

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60 N.J. woman headed to prison for penis enlargement death

By Bill Wichert | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com November 10, 2015 at 8:14

NEWARK -- Before Kasia Rivera was sentenced on Monday to five years in state prison for conducting a fatal penis enlargement procedure in 2011, her attorney, Olubukola Adetula, said she has "accepted responsibity for her actions" and wanted to "move on with the rest of her life."

Essex County Assistant Prosecutor William Neafsey, however, said Rivera may want to move on with her life, but "we still have a man that died."

"A man died because of her recklessness," said Neafsey, adding that "she had no business sticking needles into anyone, specifically sticking a needle into a man's penis."

Rivera, 38, of East Orange, received the five-year prison term after having pleaded guilty on Sept. 8 to a reckless manslaughter charge in connection with the May 2011 death of Justin Street, 22, also of East Orange. Prosecutors recommended the five-year sentence under a plea deal.

Under the sentence handed down by Superior Court Judge John Zunic, Rivera must serve slightly more than four years before becoming eligible for parole. She will receive credit for nearly eight months of time served.

Rivera declined to make a statement during Monday's hearing.

In pleading guilty, Rivera admitted to injecting silicone into Street's penis when he visited her home on Glenwood Avenue in East Orange. The silicone was not the kind used in medical procedures, authorities said.

Authorities have said the injection shot directly into Street's bloodstream, shutting down his organs, and he died as a result the following day. A medical examiner later determined Street died from a silicone embolism, and his death was ruled a homicide, authorities said.

At the time of her guilty plea, Rivera acknowledged she was not trained as a medical doctor and she was neither trained nor licensed to administer the silicone injection.

Rivera, who had worked as a bartender in Irvington, could be deported to her native Jamaica as a result of her guilty plea, authorities said.

During Monday's hearing, Adetula noted how Rivera had been cooperative in the investigation. Adetula said Rivera surrendered to the police when she knew authorities were looking for her, and she provided a statement to detectives about her role in the incident.

Rivera had been preparing to go on trial in May, but the trial was postponed due to alleged jury tampering while jury selection was under way.

At that time, three jurors said they were approached on May 8 by a man associated with Rivera about influencing the outcome of the trial. Two of the jurors said they were offered bribes of $5,000.

One of those two jurors said he gave his phone number to the man and later received three calls from a woman whom he believed to be Rivera.

At a May 12 hearing, Superior Court Judge Ronald Wigler heard those allegations while interviewing 20 prospective jurors individually. The judge then dismissed all of the jurors from serving on the trial.

Wigler found Rivera was complicit in the attempt to improperly influence the potential jury, revoked her bail and remanded her to the Essex County Correctional Facility.

When she pleaded guilty on Sept. 8, Rivera said she did not participate in the alleged tampering scheme.

Rivera claimed the man, whom she described as a friend, had acted alone in approaching the jurors, and that she didn't ask him to approach the jurors or encourage him to do so.

While the case was still pending, Rivera also was charged in unrelated cases with possession of a stun gun and injecting silicone into another woman's buttocks and breasts up to four times. Under the plea agreement, the charges related to those cases have been dismissed.

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In a rich world, a persons value depends on attractiveness and youth. If you are rich and older, just invest in destruction. The poorer the world, the less does your value depend on youth.

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Universal education for women is not in the interest of men. For some women, a good education is OK. For the majority, it is unneeded.

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"I've been dying to post this": Terminally ill dad-of-three's final Facebook message before ending his life at Dignitas

Ex-soldier Nigel Casson - who once arrested IRA commander Martin McGuinness - chose to end his life after a 10-year battle with Motor Neuron Disease

Mirror

Even in the moments before he ended his life at the Dignitas clinic, “inspirational” dad-of-three Nigel Casson found the strength to keep smiling and cracking gags.

The 62-year-old former soldier’s family told how he was telling jokes until the end. And he signed off on Facebook by saying: “I’ve been ‘dying’ to post this. Ha ha ha ha ha. Thank you and goodbye.”

He had battled motor neurone disease for 10 years, needing round-the-clock care as he was no longer able to carry out even the most basic tasks himself.

His Facebook post added: “I wanted to die with dignity instead of being tortured. Some people may think it’s the easy way out but believe me it’s not easy to leave your loving family and friends.”

The businessman asked wife Julie to post the message online shortly before he died at the clinic in Switzerland.

He never got to see the hundreds of comments because he didn’t want to be “glued to Facebook” in his final hours.

The Brit spent the time with his wife of 39 years and their three children Craig, 42, Eleanor, 38, and Rebecca, 33. Julie, 58, told yesterday how the family spent two “special” days in Switzerland before they gathered at his side as he pressed the button to administer the fatal drugs in a room at the clinic near Zurich.

Julie said: “He was making jokes right up to the point, and he was smiling.”

About his wish to die, she added: “You have got to respect people’s decisions but it was still heartbreaking when he told me this is what he wanted to do.

“He joked and laughed every day. He was an inspiration and helped the rest of us cope with the heartbreaking effects of motor neurone disease.”

The illness wrecks the victim’s muscles, eventually leaving them unable to move, speak, eat or breathe.

Nigel said it is wrong that assisted suicide is illegal in Britain.

Explaining why he chose to die now, he said in the Facebook post: “I wanted to take back control of my life and take the victory of killing me away from this disease. I wanted to die while I am happy and can still smile and not be controlled by this wicked disease any longer.”

In response, family and friends paid tribute to the “finest man” they knew. His sister Tracey Casson said: “I salute you and love you always.”

Nigel served in the Army as an infantryman in the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment during the 1970s.

He served in Northern Ireland. Julie said he once arrested Irish republican and Sinn Féin politician Martin McGuinness, who died in January.

Nigel, from Scarborough, North Yorks, left the Army after a three-year stint and then started up a scaffolding firm and a removal business.

He was diagnosed in 2007 with the debilitating disease and was given three to five years to live.

Wheelchair-bound and becoming increasingly weak, Nigel decided last August that he would go to Dignitas.

“By the end he needed help with everything,” said Julie.

“We had a team of carers giving him round-the-clock care. He relied on a wheelchair for the last seven years.

“His limbs were becoming extremely weak. He needed help with everything such as feeding, showering and going to the toilet.

“He was completely disabled but managed to keep his spirit.

“Because of his immobility and disability he found comfort in using Facebook. It kept him in touch with the world. He could still manage to touch the screen but also had eye-gaze technology to help him.”

But she added that near the end: “He was having days where he was becoming dispirited.

“He was conscious that if he didn’t go while he physically could, he would miss an opportunity.

“He didn’t want to get to a stage where he was unable to speak or unable to communicate his feelings and frustrations, and feel entombed within his own body.”

The family said they decided to speak about the ordeal to encourage the Government to change the law.

Assisting someone to commit suicide is illegal in England and Wales. It carries a potential jail sentence of 14 years.

But in 2010 the Director of Public Prosecutions issued guidelines that tried to clarify what would happen to families who go to places such as Dignitas with dying loved ones.

It was indicated that anyone acting with compassion to help end the life of someone who does not want to live would be unlikely to face charges.

The latest proposal to reform the Suicide Act 1961 was rejected in the Commons in 2015. The assisted dying bill proposed to enable “competent adults who are terminally ill” to choose to be helped to die “with medically supervised assistance”.

In Scotland there is no specific crime of assisting a suicide but helping someone die could lead to a prosecution for culpable homicide.

Switzerland allows euthanasia in certain circumstances. It is understood that last year 47 Britons went to assisted dying clinic Dignitas to end their lives, with families saying they spent thousands of pounds. Assisted dying has also been legalised in nations such as the Netherlands.

Motor neurone disease affects up to 5,000 adults in the UK. About half of sufferers die within 14 months of being diagnosed. Nigel, whose first name was David but was known by his middle name, died last week.

Julie said her husband supported the Dignity in Dying campaign, which believes terminally-ill adults should have the option of assisted dying.

She added that even though Nigel died as he wanted, the family is devastated. Julie said: “Nigel was a very realistic man and did not moan about his fate. He decided to keep a positive attitude throughout.

“He embraced what was to be the rest of his life with exceptional good humour, maintaining good spirits to the end. We are a close family and are grief-stricken by the loss of Nigel.”

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The world is full of multimillionaires who can't handle money. Because, if you have money, the first thing you spend it on, is independence.

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Judge: Rape facilitates a natural society where men are protectors

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